Gli Occhi Freddi Della Paura

Ennio Morricone

 
" It still feels very relevant and fresh, and I think the experiments provide a sense and creative provoking experience. "

Written by Joep de Bruijn - Review of the regular release



Gli Occhi Freddi Della Paura (Cold Eyes of Fear) is a 1971 crime thriller, directed by Enzo G. Castellari, who´s skills would later coincide with a Morricone project as a second unit director (Il Segreto di Sahara) and co-director of L´Umanoid.

The composer had written influential works for Italian westerns, but his giallo scores are historically equally influential. The landmark score is without a doubt Morricone´s Un Tranquillo Posto di Campagna, but L'Uccello Dalle Piume Di Cristallo was the score in 1970 that redefined the sound of the sub genre and became the musical guide for many predecessors. Gli Occhi Freddi Della Paura continued his experiments with Gruppo d’Improvvisazione Nuova Consonanza, excluding other giallo trademarks. The film was in fact not a giallo at all, only the opening pays tribute to it.

Gli Occhi Freddi Della Paura is different from some of his (more) experimental scores,
primarily because there are no deviating elements - melodic sweetness and other musical ideas - that yield to a traditional narrative. In a sense, it matches Castellari´s style, which often is quite offbeat and inconsistent. No concessions have been made for the music, which is still quite unique for such a commercial genre film. I do suspect that Morricone was asked to write a score in the veins of L'Uccello Dalle Piume Di Cristallo, but it was more of a humble request. Italian genre films are notorious for copying just about anything , but I don't think it has influenced the composer much, as his own determination and natural, musical evolution and trademarks were far more relevant in explaining similarities between projects.

The avant-garde approach for the score does feature some vague recurring elements in cues on which the jazzy bass or drum kits take the lead, a reference to the tradition of jazz, or moments that focus on a mysterious mood, but that is really it. Essentially, there is a lot of experimenting and free jazz that provides for a brilliant, relentless musical experience. The jazzy bass and drum kits are usually complemented by atonal performances of brass, string, electric guitar and synthesizer instruments. The mysteriously sounding cues are approached from transcendental feel through repetitive piano notes, while a lot of other instruments provide the more brooding and frenetic undercurrent. Some of the sounds produced by synthesizers are microscopically outdated, but that is how far I am willing to go in saying something critically.

It still feels very relevant and fresh, and I think the experiments provide a sense and creative provoking experience, that sticks long after each listening. More than anything I consider essential, this is the type of Morricone score I appreciate the most, as the non-emotive and intellectual approach is far more rewarding.



Track listing
1. Seguita (03:18)
2. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura (03:32)
3. Evaporazione (02:23)
4. Notte E Misteri (01:47)
5. Urla Nel Nulla (03:19)
6. Folle Folle (03:42)
7. Evanescente (04:13)
8. Dal Sogno E Ritorno (02:38)
9. Ritorno All 'Inizio (03:23)
10. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura I (02:45)
11. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura II (02:09)
12. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura III (01:43)
13. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura IV (02:23)
14. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura V (01:27)
15. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura VI (04:33)
16. Gli Occhi Freddi Delia Paura VII (01:48)

Total Duration: 45:03



(Written 17-07-2019)
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Released by

Dagored (regular release 2000)